Drought 2013 – are you prepared for the next year of drought?

Drought 2013 - are you prepared for the next year of drought?

Drought 2013 – are you prepared for the next year of drought?

Ask the Plant® is prepared for the drought of 2013 with a field-proven approach to managed soil fertility & plant nutrition that can give you good yields and quality while dramatically reducing water and fertilizer needs – especially under challenging growing conditions.

Drought 2012 Aug - This corn suffers from a lack of rainfall during pollination.

Drought 2012 Aug – This corn suffers from a lack of rainfall during pollination. Pollen shed and silk emergence were not coordinated. The drought had technically begun a year earlier, but was not really noticed until late in 2011. The picture was taken in Central Illinois.
Photo Credit and Description: Stu Ellis of Farmgateblog.com

Drought 2012 July - These soybeans in Central Illinois had good vegetative development, but the drought caused continual bloom and pod abortion

Drought 2012 July – These soybeans in Central Illinois had good vegetative development, but the drought caused continual bloom and pod abortion. The central part of the picture shows where leaves were intentionally removed to show the lack of any pods. Normally there might be dozens of pods in that defoliated space.
Photo Credit and Description: Stu Ellis of Farmgateblog.com

Drought 2012 July - With the drought raging in Western Indiana, the lighter soil held no water and provided little hope for this corn.

Drought 2012 July – With the drought raging in Western Indiana, the lighter soil held no water and provided little hope for this corn.
Photo Credit and Description: Stu Ellis of Farmgateblog.com

Drought 2012 July 07 - With the drought raging in Western Indiana, the lighter soil held no water and provided little hope for this corn.

Drought 2012 July – NorthWest Ohio at a time when corn should have been head high, but was only
30-40 inches. Leaves were curled in the morning to preserve moisture and the sparse population is an indication of insufficient moisture at germination time.
Photo Credit and Description: Stu Ellis of Farmgateblog.com

In 2012, we saw many farmers experience disastrous crop failures. Many dryland and pivot farmers who relied on rain and rapidly declining aquifers simply shredded what little there was of their crops – if there was emergence at all.

However, not all farmers and growers who farmed during the drought of 2012 performed poorly. In fact, a large number of Ask the Plant® customers are reporting excellent to record yields using less fertilizer and operating within drought parameters of [much] less water. They’re doing it with careful fertilizer management by monitoring and correcting plant nutrient levels at critical times to greatly relieve plant stress – which can have huge impact on water and fertilizer needs.

Preparing now in the Winter months for the oncoming drought is essential to crop success. You’ll have time to start the rejuvenation process before Spring fertilization.

During growing stages, plant nutrition needs change constantly and must be checked at the critical physiological stages of development to prevent unseen nutritional deficiencies (Hidden Hunger) in the plant before visible signs of distress in the plant occur. By the time you can see plant nutritional problems, your crop will not be able to deliver its best potential and require more fertilizer and water!

In establishing a proactive program of plant nutrition, plants maintain optimal health during the growing season and their best potential in terms of yield and quality. Plant nutrition is monitored through leaf and petiole SAP TESTING – giving you 7 to 21 days to correct nutrition problems before permanent damage occurs.
By monitoring plant nutrition according to an established schedule (which varies with the crop), Ask The Plant clients can expect to see improved performance from their crops.

The Ask The Plant method draws on 75 years of real-world experience and knowledge in Agricultural testing and consulting with many thousands of acres of proven field results World-Wide.

Ask The Plant begins with an extremely accurate soil test method that closely duplicates the way your crops extract nutrients from your soil and ignores the rest. This test is the most accurate method of determining nutrient availability to your plants. This method, originally developed in 1845, of testing soil has been honed and refined over the last 75 years and is now available from TP&S Lab only. This method of testing is not available from any other agricultural lab.

After the soil test, the Ask the Plant® approach then follows with Plant Sap testing from leaves or petioles. TPS Lab was one of the pioneers in developing this method of plant nutrition evaluation, going back to the early 1960s.

Originally, the plant nutrition standards were those published in the early 1950s but have since been periodically adjusted to reflect actual field observations, crop yields and quality, changing soil conditions and new plant varieties.

Today, these standards have evolved into the field-proven proprietary basis for consulting and recommendations that can only be acquired from TPS Lab’s Ask the Plant®.

Each test report, whether plant or soil, includes detailed interpretations and recommendations – with an additional 15 minutes of free telephone consulting, if needed.

If you are a farmer or grower of any size and you want to learn more about growing bigger yields with healthier plants utilizing less fertilizer in our drought-stricken times, send us an email on our contact form with your name, crops, acreage, and location, and your best way to contact you.

A TP&S Lab Certified Crop Advisor or his assistant will contact you and tell you what we can do for you and your situation and what sort of results you can expect when you use the Ask the Plant® Method.

No other lab can make you the crops that TPS Lab can. Contact Us at Ask the Plant® today!

Posted in Agronomy Notes.